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Super Tuesday is the date of March 1, 2016. It is called “Super Tuesday” because many states hold their primary voting on the same date which can create a situation where candidates that perform poorly often drop out as a result of the number of delegates decided in one day. This year, it is being nicknamed the “SEC Primary” which makes reference to the Southeastern Conference in college football based on the number of southern states holding their primary on Super Tuesday. Most of the Super Tuesday primaries are proportional meaning that the delegates will be awarded based on the percentage of the a candidate receives.

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The table below contains the full list of Super Tuesday states, links to state pages containing polling locations, and lists all polling start and end times.

Super Tuesday Results
Republican Results
Democratic Results

States voting on Super Tuesday

StateDelegatesType
Alabama
Find Polling Place
7am to 7pm ET
60 D, 50 R
Proportional
Open
Alaska Republican Caucus
Find Polling Place
3pm to 8pm Alaska Time
(7pm to 12am ET)
28
Proportional
Closed
American Samoa Democratic Caucus
No information is available
10Open
Arkansas
Find Polling Place
7:30am to 7:30pm CT
37 D, 40 R
Proportional
Open
Colorado Caucuses

Democratic Caucus
Dem Caucus Locations
7pm MT

Republican Caucus
GOP Caucus Details
7pm MT
79 D, 37 R
Proportional
Closed
Democrats Abroad
Find Polling Location
Voting held at sites in 40 countries through March 8
17Closed
Georgia
Find Polling Place
7am to 7pm ET
116 D, 76 R
Proportional
Open
Massachusetts
Find Polling Place
7am to 8pm ET
116 D, 42 R
Proportional
Mixed
Minnesota Caucuses
Find Caucus Location
Starts at 7pm CT
93 D, 38 R
Proportional
Open
Oklahoma
Find Polling Place
7am to 7pm CT
42 D, 43 R
Proportional
Closed
Tennessee
Find Polling Place
7am - 7pm CT
76 D, 58 R
Proportional
Open
Texas
Find Polling Place
7am to 7pm CT
252 D, 155 R
Proportional
Open
Vermont
Find Polling Place
Opens between 5am and 10am depending on town
All Vermont polls closed by 7pm ET
26 D, 16 R
Proportional
Open
Virginia
Find Polling Place
6am to 7pm ET
110 D, 49 R
Proportional
Open
Wyoming Republican Caucus
Find Caucus Location
Hours vary by location
29Closed

The History of “Super Tuesday”

“Super Tuesday was basically designed to nationalize the message, to try to reduce the influence of the so-called ‘Iowa syndrome,'” Virginia senator Chuck Robb told Robert MacNeil in an interview on “NewsHour” following the first Super Tuesday in 1988. Robb, one of the architects of the original mass-primary plan, was looking to offset a lot of the retail politics that come from spread-out primaries. Iowa is one of the first local nominating contests every four years and holds a lot of political influence.

Super Tuesday was meant to be a sink-or-swim boot camp for campaigns to determine if they could run a tight race on national issues in a manner that would be required of a candidate once he reached the White House. Super Tuesday was intended to bring out the wholesale politics that affect everyone in the United States: foreign policy, war and the economy.

Due to the consequential nature of Super Tuesday and the number of state delegates involved, many states over the years have moved their primary dates to become part of the nationwide primary and give their voters a voice earlier in the process.

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