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Coulter Says Comey Crisis is Kushner’s Fault

It’s hard to tell where Ann Coulter stands some days. She has been a fervent Trump supporter, and she has turned against him. Now she says that all of this Comey mess is not Trump’s fault—it’s Jared Kusher’s fault, and it makes for a good read in Breitbart.

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Conservative commentator and best-selling author Ann Coulter pointed out on Twitter this week that President Donald Trump is in his current predicament regarding Russia and Special Counsel Robert Mueller because of Jared Kushner’s political malpractice.

“Reminder: It was Kushner’s decision to fire [former FBI director James] Comey that brought the Independent Counsel, not Sessions recusing himself months earlier,” tweeted Coulter, who was one of the few across the media spectrum who always stood by Trump during the campaign when nearly everyone else was running straight for the hills. . .

In May, based on interviews with six White House sources, the Times reported that it was Kushner who eagerly and “strongly advocated” Comey’s “ouster” after “assuring” Trump that the firing would be a political “win” that would “neutralize protesting Democrats because they had called for Mr. Comey’s ouster over his handling of Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server.” Numerous other reporters also noted Kushner’s role in advising Trump to fire Comey.

The theory is that Kushner knew he was under investigation, and thought getting rid of Comey would derail his personal troubles. But the theory goes deeper, suggesting that Kushner may be a “mole” in the organization, actually working for the Democrats.

Bill Palmer of the Palmer Report floated a sinister theory in May that Kushner was so eager to fire Comey that he knowingly gave Trump bad advice, telling Trump whatever he needed to hear to pull the trigger on getting rid of Comey.

“Kushner is a Democrat. His friends are Democrats. He knew full well that Donald Trump firing James Comey would only serve to enrage Democrats and anti-Trump people, because no matter what they thought of Comey, they were holding out hope that Comey could take down Trump,” Palmer wrote then, implying that Kushner wanted to, above all else, look out for his interests.

Coulter does not go as far as Palmer, suggesting his advice was due to stupidity, rather than subterfuge.

That theory is a bit far-fetched. So if Kushner sincerely and naively actually believed that firing Comey would be received by Democrats with cheers like some claimed Iraqis would greet American soldiers with “sweets” and “flowers,” then that raises another set of questions about why someone who is so in over his head and apparently clueless about politics is Trump’s top aide.

Kushner is apparently in the White House to protect and defend his father-in-law. But his advising Trump to fire Comey has only dragged Trump and his whole family into the mess they are in now, as Coulter pointed out.

Coulter is also blasting Trump about the soap opera around Trump’s ridiculing of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, according to NewsMax.

Conservative firebrand Ann Coulter blasted President Donald Trump, accusing him of behaving like the paranoid captain in “The Caine Mutiny” — and scolding him to “be a man” and fire Attorney General Jeff Sessions if he’s displeased with him.

The story goes on to say that Coulter emailed the Washington Post to speak to Trump, saying, “It’s starting to feel like Capt. Queeg. He’s screwing with Sessions? Wow, is that treacherous!” [Captain Queeg was a character in the novel, “Caine’s Mutiny.”]

In fact, Coulter’s disillusionment with Trump has been evident for some time, according to the Daily Caller.

I’m not very happy with what has happened so far. I guess we have to try to push him to keep his promises. But this isn’t North Korea, and if he doesn’t keep his promises I’m out. This is why we voted for him. I think everyone who voted for him knew his personality was grotesque, it was the issues.

I hate to say it, but I agree with every line in my friend Frank Bruni’s op-ed in The New York Times today. Where is the great negotiation? Where is the bull in the china shop we wanted? That budget the Republicans pushed through was like a practical joke… Did we win anything? And this is the great negotiator? . . .

I have from the beginning been opposed to Trump hiring any of his relatives. Americans don’t like that, I don’t like that. That’s the one fascist thing he’s done. Hiring his kids.

Meanwhile, Fox News Insider reports that Coulter has been tweeting that Trump is accomplishing nothing.

Ann Coulter was a big supporter of then-candidate Donald Trump during the 2016 campaign, but so far she’s been underwhelmed by the Trump presidency.

On Friday, Coulter unleashed a series of tweets, ripping Trump for his lack of progress on building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, addressing illegal immigration and halting the flow of Middle Eastern refugees into our country.

Coulter even criticized Trump for the bombing raid in Syria, following Assad’s alleged gas attack.

Conservative pundit and columnist Ann Coulter battered Donald Trump with criticism over his decision to launch a missile strikes against assets of Bashar al-Assad’s regime in Syria, questioning Trump’s judgement and whether Assad was responsible for a chemical weapons attack launched against civilians earlier this week.

Coulter, during an interview with Rich Zeoli on Talk Radio 1210 WPHT, assailed Trump for breaking a key campaign promise because of reports he saw on television. . .

Coulter warned that the Middle East is a quagmire where ambitious Presidential agendas meet their demise.

“This is the rise of the military industrial complex, the neocons, permanent war. No President meddling in the Middle East has ever been helped by that. Never, never, never.

Goethe Behr :Goethe Behr is a Contributing Editor and Moderator at Election Central. He started out posting during the 2008 election, became more active during 2012, and very active in 2016. He has been a political junkie since the 1950s and enjoys adding a historical perspective.