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As the Trump administration hits the first 100 day mark, many Democrats are eagerly looking to the four year mark with an eye on the 2020 Presidential Election. With 2016 being a weak year for the Democratic field, 2020 is shaping up to be very crowded, with a mixture of big names and unknowns looking to carry the mantle and challenge President Trump for the White House.

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The New York Times reports on some of the names swirling as potential challengers for Trump in 2020. Here are the names and some analysis.

A vast array of Democratic leaders, divided by generations but uniformly emboldened by President Trump’s perceived vulnerability, have begun taking palpable steps toward seeking the White House in an election that is still three and a half years away.

A prominent member of that group, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., may have sounded a starting gun for the 2020 race on Sunday night as he delivered a tough-love manifesto for the party’s future to a crowd of Democrats here.

Mr. Biden called on Democrats to deliver an optimistic message aimed at the needs of struggling Americans and to emphasize issues like health care and education, which he described as largely sidelined in the last election. “I’m absolutely positive they want to be with us,” he said of people in economic distress. “We have to prove, again, we understand that hopelessness.”

Mr. Biden said he was prepared to storm the country to help revive the party, and boasted of his comfort in wooing areas that voted for Mr. Trump. “Wherever you want, just let me know, because it’s important,” he said.

Here are all the possible names listed in the NY Times article:

Joe Biden – former Vice President
Elizabeth Warren – U.S. Senator (MA)
Bernie Sanders – U.S. Senator (VT)
Corey Booker – U.S. Senator (NJ)
Kirsten Gillibrand – U.S. Senator (NY)
Amy Klobuchar – U.S. Senator (MN)
Kamala Harri – U.S. Senator (CA)
Seth Moulton – U.S. Representative (MA-6)
Eric Garcetti – Mayor (Los Angeles)
Mitch Landrieu – Mayor (New Orleans)
Andrew Cuomo – Governor (NY)
Terry McAuliffe – Governor (VA)
Martin O’Malley – Former Governor (MD)

The 2020 Democratic field will closely resemble the 2016 Republican field in terms of size and diversity of backgrounds, meaning there could be a lengthy and drawn out primary fight. Some Democratic voters will undoubtedly think that nearly anybody besides Hillary Clinton will be able to make serious inroads against Donald Trump, and they could be right to an extent. But it will be incumbent upon Democratic primary voters to find a candidate willing to go to the mat with Trump and know how to exploit his weaknesses and run a dynamic campaign.

So far, the biggest name on the list is Joe Biden. But he’s been doing what he can to squash the rumors, according to ABC News:

Such an early post-election visit to New Hampshire fueled speculation about Biden’s presidential ambitions in the days leading up to the event. He quickly put those rumors to rest.

“When I got asked to speak, I knew it was going to cause speculation,” he said to big applause. “Guys, I’m not running.” [Emphasis added]

The crowd booed and at least one person shouted, “Run, Joe Run,” before Biden continued with his speech.

He said he’s “not running,” not that he has no plans to run. If Biden chooses not to run, however, the front runner mantle will be open for anyone to claim. While Sanders and Warren remain popular, it might be wise for Democrats to bring up someone from the next generation within the party to rally behind. We’re still a long way from candidates announcing in 2019, but it’s never too early to see what’s on the menu.

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Nate Ashworth is the Founder and Senior Editor of Election Central. He's been blogging elections and politics for almost a decade. He started covering the 2008 Presidential Election which turned into a full-time political blog in 2012 and 2016.

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