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The Definitive Super Tuesday 2016 Guide

Super Tuesday is the first day in the primary cycle where the presidential campaign heads nationwide with multiple states voting on the same day. Both Democratic and Republican voters will go to the polls in Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont and Virginia. In addition, Alaska Republicans and American Samoa Democrats will caucus that day. There are 595 Republican delegates and 1,004 Democratic delegates up for grabs. All contests on Super Tuesday split up delegates proportionally based on the results of the vote. Winner take all states on the Republican side to not start until March 15th.

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Here is a state-by-state breakdown for each state and each party on Tuesday, March 1st, 2016.

Alabama Primary
Find Polling Place
7am to 7pm ET
Delegates: 60 Democratic, 59 Republican
Latest Polls: Republican, Democratic

Current polling shows that Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton enjoy significant advantage in Alabama. For Trump, his push will be helped by Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions coming out with an endorsement on Sunday.

Alaska Republican Caucus
Find Polling Place
3pm to 8pm Alaska Time (7pm to 12am ET)
Delegates: 28 Republican
Latest Polls: Republican

The one and only poll taken this year shows Donald Trump with a 4 point lead over Ted Cruz. This race could be a toss-up given how unpredictable caucuses are. I’d give a slight advantage Trump with his momentum, but anything could happen.

American Samoa Democratic Caucus
Delegates: 10 Democratic

We don’t have much information available for this caucus since the party has no website in American Samoa. No formal polling has been released. I’d give the advantage to Hillary Clinton in this contest purely on name recognition alone.

Arkansas Primary
Find Polling Place
7:30am to 7:30pm CT
Delegates: 37 Democratic, 40 Republican
Latest Polls: Republican, Democratic

The latest Republican polling shows a tight three-man race between Trump, Cruz, and Rubio. Cruz holds a 4 point lead in a recent poll, but it’s within the margin of error so this race could go in any direction. On the Democratic side, Clinton is leading handily in her home state of Arkansas.

Colorado Democratic Caucus
Find Caucus Locations
7pm MT
Delegates: 79 Democratic
Latest Polls: Democratic

The last poll of Colorado Democratic Caucus was taken back in November with a 28 point lead for Clinton. I’d expect her to maintain a similar, but maybe smaller lead at this point.

Colorado Republican Caucus
GOP Caucus Details
7pm MT
Delegates: 37 Republican

There has been no recent polling in Colorado this year. The last poll from November shows Ben Carson as the leader, so we don’t have a good pulse on this race. Furthermore, the delegates are unbound so this doesn’t amount to much more than a beauty contest.

Georgia Primary
Find Polling Place
7am to 7pm ET
Delegates: 116 Democratic, 76 Republican
Latest Polls: Republican, Democratic

The latest polls show Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton with strong leads in the state, this race leans heavily in their favor.

Massachusetts Primary
Find Polling Place
7am to 8pm ET
Delegates: 116 Democratic, 42 Republican
Latest Polls: Republican, Democratic

On the GOP side, Trump is winning on average by upwards of 26 points, he should take Massachusetts handily. On the Democratic side, polls show Clinton with a 1.5 point advantage, though recent polls have been trending her direction. This may be a close race but I suspect she’ll win.

Minnesota Caucuses
Find Caucus Location
Starts at 7pm CT
Delegates: 93 Democratic, 38 Republican
Latest Polls: Republican, Democratic

There haven’t been many polls in Minnesota, the latest were back in January and gave Marco Rubio a slight lead and Hillary Clinton a 34 point lead. The Republican side could be a tight race, while the Democratic side looks to favor Clinton.

Oklahoma Primary
Find Polling Place
7am to 7pm CT
Delegates: 42 Democratic, 43 Republican
Latest Polls: Republican, Democratic

On the Republican side, Donald Trump has started building a small lead, though Ted Cruz remains fairly close. Cruz has some built-in advantage as the Senator from neighboring Texas, however, it appears the race is starting to drift in Trump’s favor. On the Democratic side, Clinton looks to have the advantage but only slightly. The race is close but I think Clinton will take Oklahoma as well.

Tennessee Primary
Find Polling Place
7am – 7pm CT
Delegates: 76 Democratic, 58 Republican
Latest Polls: Republican, Democratic

Trump and Clinton look like the easy favorites in Tennessee. Polls show both candidates with significant margins as of days ago.

Texas Primary
Find Polling Place
7am to 7pm CT
Delegates: 252 Democratic, 155 Republican
Latest Polls: Republican, Democratic

According to polling, Ted Cruz and Hillary Clinton are the favorites in Texas. Most polls have shown Ted Cruz with a significant lead in his home state, he is likely to win though not make it to 50 percent. Texas delegates are proportional unless the winner reaches 50%, then it is a winner take all state. Cruz likely won’t hit 50% meaning he’ll split up delegates with the 2nd and 3rd place winners.

Vermont Primary
Find Polling Place
Opens between 5am and 10am depending on town
All Vermont polls closed by 7pm ET
Delegates: 26 Democratic, 16 Republican
Latest Polls: Republican, Democratic

Vermont heavily favors Bernie Sanders since he serves as their sitting Senator, this is an easy win for him. Donald Trump is also holding a sizable lead on the Republican side.

Virginia Primary
Find Polling Place
6am to 7pm ET
Delegates: 110 Democratic, 49 Republican
Latest Polls: Republican, Democratic

Trump and Clinton are both holding sizable leads in Virginia according to multiple polls. Expect both candidates to come out with a win on Tuesday night.

We’ll have full results tomorrow evening on all these races.

Nate Ashworth :Nate Ashworth is the Founder and Senior Editor of Election Central. He's been blogging elections and politics for almost a decade. He started covering the 2008 Presidential Election which turned into a full-time political blog in 2012 and 2016.